Posts Tagged ‘Alex Escobar’

Weekly FAAB Spending Targets (6/14/09)

Sunday, June 14th, 2009

The following is an updated & consolidated version of two posts I made in April 2008 concerning weekly FAAB spending targets - enjoy!

Many fantasy baseball leagues allow teams to claim available players from the free agent list/waiver wire on a first come, first served basis. Others have a weekly claim process in which the team currently at the bottom of the standings gets the first shot at the list of available players. My favorite method of awarding players to teams is the Free Agent Acquisition Budget (aka FAAB). Each team gets the same FAAB dollars (usually $100 or $1,000) to spend as it sees fit over the course of the season.

While the use of the FAAB system makes all unclaimed players available to all teams, many owners struggle with the question of how to spend their FAAB dollars as wisely as possible. Should the spending be front-loaded? Should the FAAB dollars be spent evenly over the course of the year? Should the money be hoarded until later in the season in case an injury to a real-life player necessitates a fantasy replacement or results in a hot-shot minor leaguer getting a shot at The Show?

Here are the Sherpa’s tips for spending your FAAB wisely - I call them my “FAAB Five”:

  1. Pace yourself, but not too much. All else being equal, a player acquired earlier in the season is much more likely to affect your place in the year-end standings than a player acquired later in the season. If your league allows claims at the end of each week of the season, then a player claimed at the end of Week 1 (i.e. - the first claim) should have approximately 25 times the impact of a player claimed at the end of Week 25 (i.e. - the last claim). Your FAAB spending should reflect this reality, keeping in mind that most leagues require whole dollar bids of at least $1.
  2. Assess other teams’ current needs before you bid. If you need to find a replacement for the DL’d Jake Peavy, and you’re the only team in your league that currently needs to pick up a Starting Pitcher, don’t bid against yourself. The notable exceptions to this tip involve players with potential contributions in the Steals and Saves categories. At least one other team will more than likely submit a bid on a player who may contribute in either of these two categories, even if they have no immediate need from a roster position standpoint.
  3. Monitor other teams’ FAAB spending throughout the year. Unless your league creates automated reports tracking and summarizing FAAB spending by team, this can be time-consuming, but it’s well worth the effort to know how much money other teams have left if you may be bidding against them for a player.
  4. Balance your remaining FAAB with a player’s actual abilities. Do not spend 50% of your FAAB dollars (or even 25% for that matter) on a pitcher like Dontrelle Willis, even if you are unlucky enough to have Jake Peavy, Brandon Webb, John Maine, Justin Duchscherer, and Jesse Litsch on your current pitching staff. Also, do not overspend for highly-touted rookies such as David Price, Matt Wieters, Tommy Hanson, etc. You may get lucky and get the next Ryan Braun or Evan Longoria, but you’re much more likely to get the next Alex Escobar.
  5. Timing is everything - don’t be afraid to speculate! If you have the roster positions to do so, speculate on desirable players before an injury, role change, or call-up from the minor leagues sends their value skyrocketing. Matt Laporta, Brandon Wood, Jeff Clement, Chad Fox, Jesus Guzman, Gaby Sanchez, Kyle Banks, Jensen Lewis, Brian Bruney, and Tony Pena (the pitcher!) will be much less expensive now than they will be if the players currently ahead of them on their respective teams’ depth charts falter or suffer an injury.

That said, the following is how I’d recommend spending a $100 FAAB if your league has 25 claims over the course of the season (i.e. - one at the end of each week starting with week 1). The week number is listed first, followed by the recommended amount to spend that week, followed by the recommended amount to spend year-to-date (YTD), and the implied FAAB dollars remaining. If you spend less than the recommended amount in a given week, then you will have more left over to spend in subsequent weeks, and vice versa.

  • (End of) Week 1 - spend $8; $8 spent YTD, $92 remaining.
  • Week 2 - $7; $15; $85.
  • Week 3 - $7; $22; $78.
  • Week 4 - $7; $29; $71.
  • Week 5 - $6; $35; $65.
  • Week 6 - $6; $41; $59.
  • Week 7 - $6; $47; $53.
  • Week 8 - $5; $52; $48.
  • Week 9 - $5; $57; $43.
  • Week 10 - $5; $62; $38.
  • Week 11 - $5; $67; $33.
  • Week 12 - $4; $71; $29.
  • Week 13 - $4; $75; $25.
  • Week 14 - $4; $79; $21.
  • Week 15 - $3; $82; $18.
  • Week 16 - $3; $85; $15.
  • Week 17 - $3; $88; $12.
  • Week 18 - $2; $90; $10.
  • Week 19 - $2; $92; $8.
  • Week 20 - $2; $94; $6.
  • Week 21 - $2; $96; $4.
  • Week 22 - $1; $97; $1.
  • Week 23 - $1; $98; $1.
  • Week 24 - $1; $99; $1.
  • Week 25 - $1; $100; $0.

For those of you who play with a $1,000 FAAB budget, here is how I’d recommend structuring your spending over the course of the season:

  • (End of) Week 1 - spend $77; $77 spent year-to-date; $923 remaining.
  • Week 2 - $73; $150; $850.
  • Week 3 - $71; $221; $779.
  • Week 4 - $68; $289; $711.
  • Week 5 - $65; $354; $646.
  • Week 6 - $62; $416; $584.
  • Week 7 - $59; $475; $525.
  • Week 8 - $55; $530; $470.
  • Week 9 - $52; $582; $418.
  • Week 10 - $49; $631; $369.
  • Week 11 - $46; $677; $323.
  • Week 12 - $43; $720; $280.
  • Week 13 - $40; $760; $240.
  • Week 14 - $37; $797; $203.
  • Week 15 - $34; $831; $169.
  • Week 16 - $31; $862; $138.
  • Week 17 - $28; $890; $110.
  • Week 18 - $25; $915; $85.
  • Week 19 - $22; $937; $63.
  • Week 20 - $18; $955; $45.
  • Week 21 - $15; $970; $30.
  • Week 22 - $12; $982; $18.
  • Week 23 - $9; $991; $9.
  • Week 24 - $6; $997; $3.
  • Week 25 - $3; $1,000; $0.

Your eyes are not playing tricks on you - even though we’re at the end of Week 10, and just under 40% of the season has elapsed, you’re completely justified in having already spent over 60% of your FAAB for the year!

 

Finally, everyone makes “mistakes” with their FAAB purchases - it’s just an inevitable part of the game.  How many of you spent large amounts of your FAAB on Matt Laporta or Brandon Wood earlier this season, only to see them languish on their respective teams’ bench before being sent back down to the minors?  Don’t worry - it happens.  The key is to make sure that your “mistakes” don’t make you gun-shy in pursuing other potential impact players in the future.  Just like a Closer who gives up a walk-off home run in the bottom of the 9th inning of a game, you’ve got to put it behind you and bid in future weeks as though your “mistake” had never happened.

 

Happy bidding!

The Sherpa

 

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FAABulous (4/10/08)

Thursday, April 10th, 2008

Many fantasy baseball leagues allow teams to claim available players from the free agent list/waiver wire on a first come, first served basis. Others have a weekly claim process in which the team currently at the bottom of the standings gets the first shot at the list of available players. My favorite method of awarding players to teams is the Free Agent Acquisition Budget (aka FAAB). Each team gets the same FAAB dollars (usually $100 or $1,000) to spend as it sees fit over the course of the season.

While the use of the FAAB system makes all unclaimed players available to all teams, many owners struggle with the question of how to spend their FAAB dollars as wisely as possible. Should the spending be front-loaded? Should the FAAB dollars be spent evenly over the course of the year? Should the money be hoarded until later in the season in case an injury to a real-life player necessitates a fantasy replacement or results in a hot-shot minor leaguer getting a shot at The Show?

Here are the Sherpa’s tips for spending your FAAB wisely - I call them my “FAAB Five”:

  1. Pace yourself, but not too much. All else being equal, a player acquired earlier in the season is much more likely to affect your place in the year-end standings than a player acquired later in the season. If your league allows claims at the end of each week of the season, then a player claimed at the end of Week 1 (i.e. - the first claim) should have approximately 25 times the impact of a player claimed at the end of Week 25 (i.e. - the last claim). Your FAAB spending should reflect this reality, keeping in mind that most leagues require whole dollar bids of at least $1.
  2. Assess other teams’ current needs before you bid. If you need to find a replacement next week for the DL’d Michael Barrett, and you’re the only team in your league that needs to pick up a Catcher, don’t bid against yourself. The notable exceptions to this tip involve players with potential contributions in the Steals and Saves categories. At least one other team will more than likely submit a bid on a player who may contribute in either of these two categories, even if they have no immediate need from a roster position standpoint.
  3. Monitor other teams’ FAAB spending throughout the year. Unless your league creates automated reports tracking and summarizing FAAB spending by team, this can be time-consuming, but it’s well worth the effort to know how much money other teams have left if you may be bidding against them for a player.
  4. Balance your remaining FAAB with a player’s actual abilities. Do not spend 50% of your FAAB dollars (or even 25% for that matter) on a pitcher like Livan Hernandez, even if you are unlucky enough to have Pedro Martinez, Rich Harden, John Lackey, Kelvim Escobar, and Doug Davis on your current pitching staff. Also, do not overspend for highly-touted rookies such as Clayton Kershaw, Evan Longoria, Colby Rasmus, Jay Bruce, etc. You may get lucky and get the next Ryan Braun or Hunter Pence, but you’re much more likely to get the next Nelson Cruz or Alex Escobar.
  5. Timing is everything - don’t be afraid to speculate! If you have the roster positions to do so, speculate on desirable players before an injury, role change, or call-up from the minor leagues sends their value skyrocketing. Heath Bell, Rafael Betancourt, Tony Pena (the pitcher!), Carlos Quentin, and Joey Votto (if available in your league) will be much less expensive now than they will be if the players currently ahead of them on their respective teams’ depth charts falter or suffer an injury.

That said, the following is how I’d recommend spending a $100 FAAB if your league has 25 claims over the course of the season (i.e. - one at the end of each week starting with week 1). The week number is listed first, followed by the recommended amount to spend that week, followed by the recommended amount to spend year-to-date (YTD), and the implied FAAB dollars remaining. If you spend less than the recommended amount in a given week, then you will have more left over to spend in subsequent weeks, and vice versa.

  • (End of) Week 1 - spend $8; $8 spent YTD, $92 remaining.
  • Week 2 - $7; $15; $85.
  • Week 3 - $7; $22; $78.
  • Week 4 - $7; $29; $71.
  • Week 5 - $6; $35; $65.
  • Week 6 - $6; $41; $59.
  • Week 7 - $6; $47; $53.
  • Week 8 - $5; $52; $48.
  • Week 9 - $5; $57; $43.
  • Week 10 - $5; $62; $38.
  • Week 11 - $5; $67; $33.
  • Week 12 - $4; $71; $29.
  • Week 13 - $4; $75; $25.
  • Week 14 - $4; $79; $21.
  • Week 15 - $3; $82; $18.
  • Week 16 - $3; $85; $15.
  • Week 17 - $3; $88; $12.
  • Week 18 - $2; $90; $10.
  • Week 19 - $2; $92; $8.
  • Week 20 - $2; $94; $6.
  • Week 21 - $2; $96; $4.
  • Week 22 - $1; $97; $1.
  • Week 23 - $1; $98; $1.
  • Week 24 - $1; $99; $1.
  • Week 25 - $1; $100; $0.

If your league also allows a claim before the first week of the season, here’s how I’d recommend adjusting your FAAB spending:

  • (Start of) Week 1 - spend $7; $7 spent YTD, $93 remaining.
  • Week 2 - $7; $14; $86.
  • Week 3 - $7; $21; $79.
  • Week 4 - $6; $27; $73.
  • Week 5 - $6; $33; $67.
  • Week 6 - $6; $39; $61.
  • Week 7 - $6; $45; $55.
  • Week 8 - $5; $50; $50.
  • Week 9 - $5; $55; $45.
  • Week 10 - $5; $60; $40.
  • Week 11 - $5; $65; $35.
  • Week 12 - $4; $69; $31.
  • Week 13 - $4; $73; $27.
  • Week 14 - $4; $77; $23.
  • Week 15 - $3; $80; $20.
  • Week 16 - $3; $83; $17.
  • Week 17 - $3; $86; $14.
  • Week 18 - $3; $89; $11.
  • Week 19 - $2; $91; $9.
  • Week 20 - $2; $93; $7.
  • Week 21 - $2; $95; $5.
  • Week 22 - $1; $96; $4.
  • Week 23 - $1; $97; $3.
  • Week 24 - $1; $98; $2.
  • Week 25 - $1; $99; $1.
  • Week 26 - $1; $100; $0.

I’ll post similar charts for a $1,000 FAAB later today.

Until then,

The Sherpa